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What do you feed as an everyday food?

Discussion in 'Foods, Treats & Home Recipes.' started by crazy4crabs, Nov 5, 2006.

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  1. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    Yes they did, since in the morning the plate looked NOTHING like the pics. Stuff was all over LOL
     
  2. nancy

    nancy "Preparing For Second Molt"

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    Hi Vicki. I think this would be a very good place to be able to access the edible list. I loved your dishes. Once in awhile I make my crabs an omelet with broccoli and parmesan cheese (a tiny bit) sprinkled on top. I team this with a side of sweet poato fries cooked in extra virgin olive oil. For dessert I'll slice up some apple. I then sprinkle everything with sea salt, grated cuttle bone and spirulina for flavor. The crabs seem to love it. I'll try your sushi rolls. Thanks for the tip.
     
  3. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    Ok here it is!

    Acorns (crush and soak overnight in salt water then drain before serving)
    Alfalfa
    Almonds, crushed
    Amaranth (Ancient grain)
    Anchovy oil
    Apple and natural, unsweetened apple sauce
    Apricot
    Arame
    Artichokes
    Asparagus
    Avocado
    Bamboo (live plants make wonderful tank toys and grazing)
    Banana
    Barley
    Beans, yellow wax
    Bell peppers (red, yellow, orange, green or purple)
    Bee pollen
    Bilberries/Huckleberries
    Blackberry leaves
    Blackberry
    Blackstrap molasses (unsulfured) - amazingly high in nutrients such as calcium and potassium; 1-2 times monthly
    Bladderwrack
    Bloodworms (alive or dead)
    Blueberries
    Borage blossoms (Borago officinalis)
    Broccoli and leaves
    Brown rice
    Brussels sprouts
    Cabbage (all varieties)
    Calcium carbonate powder, plain
    Calendula flowers (Calendula officinalis)-Also known as "pot marigolds"
    Camellia (Camellia japonica)
    Canteloupe
    Carnation flowers (Dianthus caryophyllus)
    Carrots
    Carrot tops
    Cauliflower and leaves
    Celery leaves
    Cereal; Brown rice, soy, wheat or 7 grain, muesli
    Chamomile flowers
    Chard
    Cheese (be sure to get all natural varieties, serve as occasional treat)
    Cherimoya
    Cherry
    Chestnuts
    Chicken bones
    Chicken, cooked and unseasoned (smash the bone for marrow access)
    Chickweed
    Cholla wood
    Cilantro
    Citrus (all fruits)
    Clams
    Clover blossoms and leaves
    Coconut and coconut oil
    Cod liver oil
    Collards
    Cork bark
    Corn (on the cob, too)
    Cornmeal
    Cranberries (dehydrated)
    Crickets
    Crustaceans (any and all crustacea including crayfish, lobster, shrimp and other crabs)
    Cucumber
    Currants
    Cuttlefish bone, powdered
    Dairy products (milk, cheese, live-culture yogurt) **
    Daisies (Bellis perennis)
    Dandelion flowers, leaves and roots (Taraxacum officinale)
    Day lilies (Hemerocallis)
    Egg, scrambled or soft boiled
    Eggshells
    Elderberry flowers (Sambucus canadensis)
    Extra-virgin olive oil
    Fig (ripe fruit only)
    Fish flakes w/out chemical preservatives
    Fish Oil
    Flax seeds/Linseeds (crushed)
    Flax seed oil (small amounts infrequently)
    Frozen fish food (esp. algae, krill and brine shrimp)
    Garbanzos
    Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.)
    Gooseberry (ripe or overripe)
    Grape Leaf
    Grapes
    Grapevine (vines and root)
    Green and red leaf lettuce (not iceburg; dark green)
    Green Beans
    Hazel leaves
    Hempseed Meal
    Hibiscus flowers (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)
    Hikari products: brine shrimp, krill, crab cuisine, sea plankton (no preservatives)
    Hollyhock flowers
    Honey (organic, or at least locally produced, for anti-microbials)
    Honeybush
    Honeydew Melon
    Honeysuckle flowers (Japanese Lonicera japonica)
    Impatiens (Impatiens wallerana)
    Irish Moss
    Japanese red maple leaves, dried (Acer palmatum)
    Jasmine flowers (Jasmine officinale)
    Johnny-Jump-Up flowers--(Viola tricolor)
    Kamut
    Kelp
    Kiwi
    Lentils
    Lilac (Syringa vulgaris)
    Lima Beans
    Lobster with crushed exoskeleton
    Locusts (dead)
    Lychee fruit (fresh; no kernel)
    Macadamia nuts
    Madrona wood
    Mango
    Mangrove (small live trees can be obtained on eBay, use in water basin)
    Maple leaves
    Maple syrup
    Marion Berries
    Milk thistle flowers (Silybum marianum)
    Mint (but not peppermint!)
    Most organic baby foods
    Muscadine (grapes)
    Mushrooms
    Mussels
    Nasturtium flowers (Tropaeolum majus)
    Nettle (wilted)
    Nettle, stinging (pour boiling water over leaves first)
    Oak Leaves and bark
    Octopus
    Okra
    Olive and olive oil (extra virgin)
    Oranges
    Oysters
    Pansy flowers and leaves (Viola X Wittrockiana)
    Papaya
    Parsley
    Parsnip
    Passionflowers (Passifloraceae - passion flower family)
    Passionfruit
    Peaches
    Peanut butter (avoid sugar, corn syrup and hydrogenated oils)
    Peanuts
    Pears
    Peas
    Pecans
    Pecan bark
    Persimmon
    Petunia blossoms
    Pineapple
    Pistachio nuts
    Plum
    Pomegranate
    Popcorn (unseasoned, unflavored, unbuttered)
    Potato (no green parts, including eyes)
    Psyllium & husks
    Pumpkin
    Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)
    Quinoa (New World grain)
    Raisins (no sulphur dioxide)
    Raspberry
    Red raspberry leaves (highest bioavailable calcium source + vit. C and trace minerals)
    Rolled Oats
    Rooibus (or rooibos)
    Roquette (Eruca vesicaria)
    Rose petals (Rosa spp)
    Rose hips
    Royal Jelly
    Russian Olive leaves (Elaeagnus angustifolia)
    Sage blossoms (Salvia officinalis)
    Salmon
    Sand dollars
    Sardines
    Scallops
    Sea biscuits
    Sea fan (red or black)
    Sea grasses
    Sea salt
    Sea Sponges
    Semolina
    Sesame seeds (crushed)
    Sesame oil (in tiny amounts as appetite stimulant)
    Shrimp and exoskeletons
    Snails (use human food grade only; not wild snails)
    Sorrel (Rumex acetosa)
    Soy and soy products (human grade; miso, tofu, etc.)
    Spelt
    Spinach
    Spirulina (complete protein and chlorophyll source; highest in beta carotene)
    Sprouts (flax, wheat, bean, alfalfa, etc.)
    Squid
    Squash (and squash blossom)
    Star fruit (carambola)
    Strawberry and tops
    Sugar cane
    Sunflower Seeds (crushed), flowers and leaves (Helianthus)
    Swamp cypress wood (false cypress, taxodium sp.)
    Sweet potato
    Sycamore leaf
    Tahini (no garlic variety)
    Tamarillo
    Tangerine
    Timothy hay
    Tomato
    Triticale
    Tulip flowers (Tulipa spp.)
    Tuna
    Turnip greens
    Viola flowers
    Violet flowers (Viola odorata)
    Walnuts
    Wasa All-Natural Crispbread (Oat flavor)
    Watercress
    Watermelon
    Wheat grass
    Wheat
    Wheat germ
    Whitefish
    Whole Wheat Couscous
    Wild rice
    Zucchini (and zucchini flowers)*
     
  4. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    Here's the edible flowers

    Borage blossoms (Borago officinalis)
    Calendula flowers (Calendula officinalis)-Also known as "pot marigolds"
    Camellia (Camellia japonica)
    Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus)
    Chamomile (Matricaria recutita)
    Clover (flowers, leaves)
    Daisies (Bellis perennis)
    Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) (flowers, leaves, roots)
    Day lilies (Hemerocallis)
    Elderberry flowers (Sambucus canadensis)
    Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.)
    Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)
    Honeysuckle flowers (Japanese Lonicera japonica)
    Impatiens (Impatiens wallerana)
    Jasmine (Jasmine officinale)
    Johnny-Jump-Up flowers--(Viola tricolor)
    Lilac (Syringa vulgaris)
    Milk thistle (Silybum marianum)
    Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus)
    Pansy (Viola X Wittrockiana) (flowers and leaves)
    Passionflowers (Passifloraceae - passion flower family)
    Petunia
    Rose (Rosa spp)
    Sage (Salvia officinalis)
    Sunflower (Helianthus) (flowers, leaves, seeds)
    Tulips (Tulipa spp.)
    Violet (Viola odorata)

    Other herb flowers-The tiny flowering blooms of the
    following spices are edible: anise, basil, bee balm, chives, coriander
    (cilantro), dill, fennel, garlic, oregano, rosemary, and thyme.


    MOST POPULAR EDIBLE FLOWERS

    (These are the most commonly consumed flowers of the eighty edible
    varieties.)

    * Borage blossoms (Borago officinalis)-Tiny blue flowers have
    slight cucumber flavor.
    * Calendula flowers (Calendula officinalis)-Also known as "pot
    marigolds", multi-colored blooms with a peppery taste. Sometimes
    called "poor man's saffron"
    * Carnation flowers (Dianthus caryophyllus)-Red, pink, and
    white blossoms with clove taste.
    * Chamomile flowers (Chamaemilum nobile)-Daisy-like flowers
    with a slight hint of apple flavor. Especially good for parrots when
    calming influence is needed.
    * Chives (Allium schoenoprasum)-the lavander-pink pom pom
    flower is actually composed of many small florets. Flowers have a mild
    onion flavor.
    * Daisies (Bellis perennis)-Yellow and white flowers with
    light mint or clover flavor. Flowers
    * Dandelion flowers - pictured (Taraxacum officinale)-Small
    yellow blossoms have honey flavor when picked young. Older flowers are
    bitter but my Eclectus parrots do not seem to notice. Also offer the
    dandelion leaves which are an excellent source of nutrition.
    * Day lilies (Hemerocallis)-Many colored blossoms with sweet
    taste and crunchy lettuce texture. Flower buds and blossoms can be
    consumed at all stages of growth. Note: Many lilies (Lillium species)
    contain alkaloids and are NOT safe for parrots or people.
    * Elderberry flowers (Sambucus canadensis)-Sweet tasting
    flowers. For colds and chills, Gypsies mix elderberry flowers, yarrow
    and peppermint and steep in boiling water for 13 minutes, and drink
    tea frequently.
    * Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.)Flowers of many colors grow on a
    spike with flowers above each other, all usually facing the same way.
    Has lettuce texture and flavor.
    * Hibiscus flowers (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)-Tropical blossoms
    in a variety of colors have slightly acidic taste. One of the favorite
    flowers of most parrot species.
    * Honeysuckle flowers (Japanese Lonicera japonica)-Small white
    to yellow trumpet-shaped blossoms are sweet and delicious. Parrots
    relish these flowers and the Loridae family of birds especially loves
    the honeysuckle nectar. Only the Japanese honeysuckle is edible and
    only the blooms should be used as the berries are extremely poisonous.
    Offer only the flowers so that no berries on the vines will
    accidentally be eaten.
    * Impatiens (Impatiens wallerana)-Multi-color small blooms
    with mild taste.
    * Johnny-Jump-Up flowers--(Viola tricolor) Yellow, violet, and
    lavender flowers with wintergreen flavor. Leaves are also edible and
    contain vitamin C.
    * Lilac (Syringa vulgaris)--Lavender blossoms have heavy
    floral fragrance and lemon flavor.
    * Marigolds flowers (Tagetes signata pumila)-Bright yellow and
    orange flowers with citrus flavor.
    * Milk thistle (Silybum marianum)-Purple flowers are edible as
    well as leaves and seeds which are known for benefits to liver.
    * Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus)--Red, yellow, and orange
    flowers have a tangy, peppery flavor and are the most popular of all
    edible flowers. Leaves can be eaten too.
    * Pansies (Viola X Wittrockiana)-Purple, white, yellow
    bi-color blooms have a sweet, tart flavor. Flowers
    * Passionflowers - pictured (Passifloraceae - passion flower
    family)--Passiflora caerulea and Passiflora edulis are two of the
    hundreds of varieties. Some vines produce large greenish white and
    purple blossoms and then orange or purple edible fruit, depending upon
    the variety of the plant. *See website below with information and
    photos of 200 Passionflower varieties.
    * Roses (Rosa spp)-Some of the tastiest rose varieties are
    Rosa xdamascena, Rosa gallica, and Rosa rugosa, Flower carpet rose,
    Double Delight, Mirandy, and Tiffany variety. Roses have a slight
    fruity flavor.
    * Sage (Salvia officinalis)-Lavender-blue flower spikes grow
    only on the culinary variety. The variegated species of sage do not
    flower. Flowers have distinctive sage flavor.
    * Other herb flowers-The tiny flowering blooms of the
    following spices are edible: anise, basil, bee balm, chives, coriander
    (cilantro), dill, fennel, garlic, oregano, rosemary, and thyme.
    * Sunflowers (Helianthus)--Many varieties but most have yellow
    leaves around a "black eye" center. Mature flowers contain the seed
    that all parrots find so irresistible!
    * Tree flowers-Parrots can be offered the flowering blooms of
    the following trees: Apple, bottlebrush, citrus (orange, lemon, lime,
    grapefruit, kumquat), eucalyptus, melaleuca, and plum.
    * Tulips (Tulipa spp.)-Multi-color flowers with crisp, cucumber taste.
    * Vegetable flowers-Butterblossom squash flowers have slight
    squash taste. Zucchini flowers, podded pea flowers (ornamental peas
    are poisonous), okra, pumpkin, and runner bean flowers are edible.
    * Violets (Viola odorata)-Deep violet and white color with
    sweet wintergreen taste.
     
  5. Emma Jean

    Emma Jean (Small Crab)

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    I'm new to this site and don't really know if I'm doing this right but I need some help with foods. I've done some research on this and other sites and have found many conflicting ideas about what food they should be fed. I've had hermies for four now and have been feeding a combination of the following foods with random extras: FMR land hermit crab food, FMR land hermit crab treat, Tetra Terrafauna Vitaminized hermit crab cakes, Wardley Dried whole shrimp (which most of them won't eat), Zoo med hermit crab Fruit-salad, Hikari crab cuisine, HBH hermit crab variety Bites and hermit crab cookies, and T-rex crab Island fruit and flower crab food. I also feed dried papaya, popcorn and other random things from in the kitchen. I want to buy the organic foods off the website listed on here but will it hurt them to continue feeding them this stuff as well because some sites say yes and some say they will die but one has been on this diet for four years and she's still here. Just looking for some helpful tips. Hope I didn't waist anyone's time.

    Emmajean
     
  6. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    Here's how I see it, the food is full of preservatives and items that are bad for hermit crabs. Think of it this way, as a human you can eat crackers. Is it bad for you, not really but will it give you the vitamins and minerals you need to thrive and be healthy? No. In other words, you can live on it but it's not going to make you thrive and give you the necessary vitamins to do this.

    It's going to be a personal decision for you. Only you can decide what you want to feed your crabs. The members here will suggest what they feed theirs and then you go over the information and decide what you want to do. No one will be negative towards you for your choices.
     
  7. shmama

    shmama Hi, I'm New Here!

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    Hi all :)
    I need help on the sweet potato thing- since I never liked them myself, I don't know much about them. Are they the same things as yams? I have a huge raw yam but don't know how to prepare it for the crabs? Any suggestions?
    Thanks, Shmama
     
  8. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    I dont eat them, but I think they are the same. Someone will say if they arent LOL

    You can feed raw or cook a bit in dechlor water or microwave.
     
  9. Emma Jean

    Emma Jean (Small Crab)

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    Thanks for the info. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't feeding them some kind of poison. I have been reading everything on this site and others and last night I offered them some carrots, broccoli, papaya, endive and honey but they didn't even touch it. Oh well, I'll keep trying. Thanks again. Any other ideas about what what anyone else's hermie's love.
     
  10. MaggiesMom

    MaggiesMom Hi, I'm New Here!

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    The only thing I can get my hermies to eat (at least right now) is freeze-dried blood worms. They haven't touched any of their regular dry food, none of the freeze-dried shrimp. I'm going to try some frozen squid tonight and see what happens. Maybe this treat will bring my guys up out of the substrate for a change! :eek:
     
  11. shmama

    shmama Hi, I'm New Here!

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    I read an earlier post of Vickie's & decided to make them scrambled eggs today (& wash an egg shell out for them too). Scarlett kept peeking out of her flower pot hut at them all afternoon, then once I turned on the evening light, all four strawberries came out & had an egg-fest, it was really cool! (I don't think they paid much attn to the shell yet, but we'll see in the morning). I am gonna try making krill scrambled eggs next like Vicke suggested. This was the first time since Christmas that I have seen them all around the food dish at the same time. FUN!-& what a mess they made for me. lol :)
     
  12. nancy

    nancy "Preparing For Second Molt"

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    Have you made a copy of Julia Crabs safe foods? Crabs need four ingedients in order to stay healthy. First is protein. Give them a daily dose of krill, chicken, fish etc. Next ingredient is Zeaxethin. Foods high in this are broccoli, collards ,cornmeal, spirulina etc. You can find this list on the Epicurean Hermit website. Another importand ingredient is calcium. I use grated cuttlebone. Also important is cellulose. I provide this by feeding the crabs oak leaves and oakbark, but it can also be provided by grating corncobs and by providing unseasoned popcorn. The last ingredient is lipid. Lipids are oils and fats and the hermies need this to keep their exo's from drying out too much. I saute my crabs meals about three times a week in extra virgin olive oil. They gobble it up. For instance, last night I sauted some chicken, sweet potato, corn, and apple for dessert. It sounds complicated but it's not. If you have any more questions ask Ms. Vicky, who sells a wonderful variety of healthy, happy hermie eats, or Ms. Julia of the Epicurean Hermit. Good luck.
     
  13. hermiecrab101

    hermiecrab101 (Micro Crab)

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    does anyone have good home recipes?? how do you make eggs??:confused:
     
  14. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    Scrambled eggs? crack eggs into a bowl, beat with a fork, cook in some olive oil in a pan, serve..
     
  15. ilovebeans

    ilovebeans "Never Molted"

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    I use Fish Flakes and sometimes i feed them a little bit of carrot and apple.

    Happy Crabbing!:D:D:D
     
  16. crazy4crabs

    crazy4crabs "Second Molt In Progress"

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    can u give them like regular eggshells. do they need to be washed out or is it okay to have a little bit of raw egg inside?
     
  17. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    Id wash them out. You can also crush the shells and sprinkle ontop of other foods.
     
  18. Jason

    Jason Moderator

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    If you hard boil the eggs, you don't have to wash them first, but I would with raw egg. Even if only to help keep the tank clean.
     
  19. nancy

    nancy "Preparing For Second Molt"

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    What I try to do is to feed mine a balanced diet. That way I feel like I've done my part. I don't sit up all night to watch which one eats what. I believe that our little friends know what they need and that's what they'll eat. Crabs eat more at different times during their yearly cycles. My suggestion would be to offer them healthy food and let them take it from there.
     
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