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streaker not doing too well...

Discussion in 'Emergency Care - 911.' started by crazeecrabber103, Mar 6, 2006.

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  1. hermom

    hermom "Never Molted"

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    Just an afterthought, as to when I started learning how to pick up or hold hermies. Your local pharmacy will have "finger cots", aka finger condoms, and latex gloves - real cheap. (About 8 cents ea). These will allow your confidence to grow in handling hermies, as you can still feel them, but they will pinch on the latex rather than a surprising chomp on flesh.
    hermom
     
  2. moire_eel

    moire_eel "Second Molt, A Success"

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    I rarely handle my crabs at all! I don't bathe my crabs, ever, and I usually clean my tank in sections, so I usually pick the crabs in the section I need to clean up by the shell and move them to the other side, and that's it. Occasionally I get one out for my husband to hold, and then we let it walk around on his shirt or his arm (while sitting on the floor or the sofa, just in case of a fall) Then I'll let the crab walk on me for a minute or so before returning him to the tank. I'm not worried about them pinching -- I've never had one of my crabs pinch me, at least not after being brought home from the store. I just make sure they're not in a precarious position. My fear is only that I will cause them stress -- for me handing them is lots of fun!

    Lately I have been thinking that some of my larger crabs especially might benefit from being out so that they can walk around a bit ... "stretch their legs", so to speak. I have a 75 gallon tank, but even that is cramped living quarters for a crab. Perhaps holding them in my hands within the familiar environs of the crabitat some first will help them make the transition to exploring a "crab-safe" room a little less stressful. I will try your method of holding them while feeding them and see how it goes.
     
  3. hermom

    hermom "Never Molted"

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    I'm disappointed that your posting has little or nothing to do with my posting about handling and palm-feeding. Perhaps it might be best not to attempt my method of palm-feeding if your hermies are not accustomed to handling or socialization. As far as seeing how it goes, it's a proven method. It relies on the hermies' owner's effort to establish the comfort zone, not "we'll see how it goes". You can either succeed or not, depending on your effort.
     
  4. moire_eel

    moire_eel "Second Molt, A Success"

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    I'm sorry ... my point was that generally I have avoided handling my hermit crabs for fear of causing them stress. I do feel that hermit crabs have different personalities, and thus different levels of tolerance of handling -- that is what I meant by "we'll see how it goes". I have some crabs that I can pretty much guarantee would retract into their shells and stay that way no matter what. For those crabs, there may be no such thing as a comfort zone where my hand is concerned, at least not anytime soon. I agree that it would be better to start gradually. I think that offering raisins between my fingers, giving the crab an option to accept or to move to a location where they feel safe, is a good start. But if I feel like being handled is causing my crabs stress, I will stop doing it. I think there are definitely ways to handle crabs that are more likely to make them feel safe, and I'm very interested in what has worked for you. But I don't believe that there's a way to make any and all crabs feel comfortable with handling. They're basically wild animmals, and living in captivity is already a huge adjustment that far too many don't survive.
     
  5. hermom

    hermom "Never Molted"

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    For someone so critical of my techniques, I was quite surprised to read on your own website that you had "heard about others" who handled & hand-fed hermies (no names mentioned) and how thrilled you were about your accomplishment, in spite of your negative response to my postings on a proven method. As I said previously, it depends on the effort you put into handling as to what you can expect back. Think about it...at some point, all of our animals (cats, dogs, hermies, etc.) came from the wild. It's up to you to overcome their fears and bring out the best in them. Anyone can keep a tank of wild hermies, but that's not the idea of learning and benefitting from having pets of any sort. I also noticed on your site that you don't seem to have a great survival rate, with all the RIP's. How many hermies have you "lost" altogether?
    So glad you benefitted from my postings on handling and feeding. I shall not have any part on postings of this matter, and hope the thread/topic will be closed, as it is not beneficial to other members.
     
  6. Jason

    Jason Moderator

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    As with any pet, they will get used to the hand that feeds them so to speak. I have seen captive born snakes that were never handled strike at anything that moves, while wild ones that were handles every day look forward to their daily playtime. I have even had a fish that liked to be petted which is not a normal thing for fish. [​IMG]

    I think this topic would make a great poll. Hand-feeding Poll
     
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