1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

New Dietary Information: Zeaxanthin

Discussion in 'Foods, Treats & Home Recipes.' started by Kali_Ma, Nov 19, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Kali_Ma

    Kali_Ma (Small Crab)

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2004
    Messages:
    311
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Oakland, CA
    I'm reading Crustacean Nutrition by the World Aquaculture Society. It's a hard slog, let me tell you. But I have finished the chapter on carotenoids. I will be writing an article on all the information found in that chapter, but I think for the time being, it's very important that people are aware of a couple of things.

    Astaxanthin is the critical carotenoid as far as crustacean health is concerned. It is 10 times more potent than the next most powerful carotenoid, and that is the form that crustaceans can use most efficiently. They can convert other carotenoids into astaxanthin, but it costs them in efficiency. It turns out that beta carotene is actually one of the weakest carotenoids as they affect crab health and biology. Zeaxanthin is a better substance if you cannot get astaxanthin, it is the quickest to convert biologically to astaxanthin. Beta carotene requires time and several oxidative steps to achieve the same end.

    Krill, krill oil, copepods, spirulina (even more than you serve already), capsicum (red bell pepper), and xanthophyll-containing foods such as oats, wheat and corn are very important in crustacean diet. Crayfish are high in astaxanthin as well. "Biosynthesis or deposition of carotenoids may be adversely affected by poor lipid nutrition." More oily foods -- fresh seafood would be better than dried. It appears that good feed ratios of astaxanthin are about 1% - 100 mg/100 g of diet. This is for prawns, but can be applied to our crabs as well. They should have constant access to low levels of astaxanthin, or at the least, slightly higher levels of zeaxanthin.

    I just compiled a list of zeaxanthin-containing foods. Refer to:

    http://epicureanhermit.com/index.php?option=com_content...iew&id=153&Itemid=25
     
  2. kuplakrabs

    kuplakrabs "Second Molt, A Success"

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2004
    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western NY
    Kerie,
    I said the same thing over at LHC-but when are you going to publish a book by Julia Crab? I'd be first in line for an autographed copy! Preferably with a picture of you rockin' out on your guitar on the back inside of the jacket [​IMG]

    The crabbing world is lucky you got so addicted to the little guys [​IMG]
     
  3. Kali_Ma

    Kali_Ma (Small Crab)

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2004
    Messages:
    311
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Oakland, CA
    Girlfriend, you slay me. I only have time & energy to devote to small articles, one at a time, right now. But hey, once I have 20 or 30 of them, maybe I can just compile them and cheat up a book for you. [​IMG]
     
  4. kuplakrabs

    kuplakrabs "Second Molt, A Success"

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2004
    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western NY
    Yeah right...once the word was out that I had a book written by Julia Crab, I'd be hounded by everyone [​IMG]

    I'm completely serious. You have really given crabbers everywhere some fantastic information. It would be invaluable to have that at our fingertips in the form of a book. Your always breaking new ground.
     
  5. Kali_Ma

    Kali_Ma (Small Crab)

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2004
    Messages:
    311
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Oakland, CA
    Sheesh, you're making me blush. But don't stop. LOL

    I have a long way to go before I could possibly write a book on this subject. Crustacean Nutrition is 576 pages long, and I only managed to get through the carotenoid chapter after two weeks and the translation help of a friend who is an actual biochemist.

    This is going to take some time. But someday, we may actually have a good solution for captive mortality rates and molt difficulties.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page