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Is this safe,

Discussion in 'Nutrition & Water' started by imported_peach, Dec 27, 2009.

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  1. imported_peach

    imported_peach "First Molt, A Success"

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    Canola oil, I've checked everywhere on safe and unsafe food lists? since I don't have any extra virgin olive oil to put on shell openings I was wondering if I could use this instead of that.
     
  2. Mckenny

    Mckenny "PM Jason For Custom Title"

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    I'm confused...what shell openings? :think:
     
  3. emmac350

    emmac350 "Fourth Molt In Progress"

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    Why would you put oil on shell openings? If anything, you ought to put a bit of ocean water into a shell - it tricks the crabs into thinking that there was a crab living in the shell recently.

    I actually was reading a study the other day through Google Scholar about how crabs looking for shells will turn down even their favorite foods to find the shells, and crabs looking for food (even if their shells fit badly) will ignore shells. Crabs in the wild, also, are much less likely to go for food than shells, surprisingly.

    They did the experiment by digging pits in the sand on a beach (this experiment was done with Straws and Indos) and in one pit they placed a dead crab (of the species they were trying to test) and a shell, in another they had food, in another water, and in another they didn't put anything. Almost twice as many crabs were attracted to the dead crab and they formed a line to pass shells down along. The researchers then took crabs from the line and placed them in a bucket with food and none of the crabs would eat it - they just got back into line (in the bucket) to wait for shells. When a shell was added, they all changed shells and then ate the food.

    They did a similar experiment with the food crabs, except they put them in a bucket with a shell and fewer crabs would change shells as they were all looking for food.
     
  4. imported_peach

    imported_peach "First Molt, A Success"

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    umm well u put a little bit of olive oil in shell openings and crabs like them more, so after you boil shells you put a little olive oil in the shell opening
    and I'll put some salt water in the shells before I put them in the tat. but my question still stands, Is canola crab safe?
     
  5. emmac350

    emmac350 "Fourth Molt In Progress"

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    Canola oil is safe for food, but do not put it in shells. It's a waste of the oil for one thing, and it'll actually make crabs less likely to look at the shells for their shell and more at them for food. Crabs separate food and shells into two different categories and confusing the lines between those categories (i.e. putting food on a shell you want them to try on) will not help them to change into shells more.
     
  6. imported_peach

    imported_peach "First Molt, A Success"

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    ok emmac your comment got me wondering so I asked some questions on a different forum and here's what someone said about olive oil on shell's openings:
     
  7. emmac350

    emmac350 "Fourth Molt In Progress"

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    Okay, here's the study I was referencing, and since it's pretty heavy in the scientific mumbo-jumbo and I want it to be understandable for the kids on here, I'll give the details in plain English. http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/31261

    Results (section 3):

    Clean empty shells were only attractive if a crab walked by - unnoticed at a distance. If a dead same-species crab was placed on the beach, up to 100 crabs from up to 10 meters away would come to the shell within 20 minutes. These crabs never touched the dead crabs, but investigated each others' shells and, if an empty shell was provided, a shell-changing cascade (Crab A changes into new shell, Crab B changes into Crab A's old shell, etc.) would occur.

    Crabs attracted to food source (dead snails, flowers, etc.) didn't investigate each others' shells nearly as often as those attracted to what would normally be a 'empty shell' smell - that of a dead same-species crab.

    Pit Experiments - they did the same setup as before (placing things on the beach) but this time put them in a hole with sloping sides. Again, shell switching cascades only occurred at the pit with the dead hermit crab in it. Additionally, 10 times more crabs went to the dead same-species crab pit than any of the others. At the second site tested (rugosus crabs as opposed to strawberries), shell switching did occur but crabs attracted to dead crabs switched more than those attracted to food.

    Discussion - Both land and marine crabs are more attracted to dead same-species crabs for their shells, and display behavior related to shell acquisition, not feeding. Attracted crabs switch shells and leave instead of eating the dead crab.

    Land crabs, unlike marine crabs, are not attracted to the odor of dying snails. Marine crabs are attracted to dead or dying shells and change shells as soon as the snail is dead. Dead snail odors attract Coenobita only as food, and do not attract crabs looking for shells.

    Page 180: "Under experimental conditions, Rittschof (1980a; et al., 1992) and Gilchrist and Abele (1984) found marine hermit crabs responding to shell cues did not eat and potential foods were unattractive. Marine hermit crabs in poorly fitting shells aggregate at shell odor sources and switch into available shells while crabs in well-fitting shells flee or withdraw" and "In this study Coenobita attracted to food odors displayed few shell exchange behaviors. It was hypothesize that land hermit crabs attracted to food odors are in better fitting shells and that crabs attracted to dead conspecific odors are in worse fitting shells." (conspecific = same-species crab)

    I'm not trying to be mean, but there's very little research out there on land hermit crabs, so let's try to use what little we do have. If crabs go somewhere looking for food because of a smell, they're less likely to try on the shell, whereas if they go somewhere looking for a shell, they're less likely to respond to food.
     
  8. limeslide

    limeslide Guest

    It depends on the crab, Emma.
     
  9. emmac350

    emmac350 "Fourth Molt In Progress"

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    Why do you say that?
     
  10. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    what site was this mentioned on about the oil in shells? Personally I wouldn't put oil in the shell or on it. What if the crab got the oil on their gills, I can't imagine that being good. Stick with the water and check the shells more often so that you can keep water in them. I don't even do that(add watrer to mine)

    thanks for the link to the info Emma, that's the kind of information that's needed out here!
     
  11. LordRhal

    LordRhal "Preparing For Third Molt"

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    I doubt anyone goes around in the wild rubbing oil on random shells. So I don't see the point of doing it in captivity :p
    They'll change shells on their own terms, not yours.
    As emma said, hermies are misunderstood creatures. So it is easy for people to start rumors about something and then have others believe it as fact.

    Just be patient and your hermits will change shells when they want. I have 1 that I've owned now for 4 months and is still in the same shell, despite their being an abundance of different shells. On the other hand I have one that changes once a week. They all have different personalities and will act differently
     
  12. emmac350

    emmac350 "Fourth Molt In Progress"

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    Some crabs just don't want to change shells until THEY want to (does that make sense?). I have one guy (Rack) that I got two Septembers ago that changed his shell last Christmas. He's still in the shell, and it still fits him (he's so tiny, I don't understand, but I leave him alone as he's super shy and I rarely see him). He has no need to change his shell - why should I worry about it?

    I have another crab who just changed her shell (Toodles is her name) for the first time in just under a year. I bought her January 4 last year, and she (an E) was in that stripey shell a lot of Es come in. She's worn that same shell until two nights ago, when she changed into a much bigger turbo that she can fully retract into, with room to spare. Of course, when she did this, she had a TON of trouble getting her abdomen into the shell as she has the biggest molt sac I've ever seen a picture of...if you want to see it, the picture is located at http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v50/emmac350/Crabs/DSCN3396.jpg. I've never had a crab display a molt sac like that before, so I'm hoping she gets the molt over with soon because it seems to be giving her a lot of problems in her shells. I'm not sure why it's blue, but I compared the photo with Marie at the Hermit Crab Paradise forum and it looks just like one set of pictures she has of one of her crabs pre-molt.
     
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