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Is this all right?

Discussion in 'What's Cooking? - Not Poison!' started by NotaMallard, Sep 20, 2008.

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  1. NotaMallard

    NotaMallard "First Molt, A Success"

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    I need to see if this powder I found is safe. It's called Truegreens, a concentrated green-food formula. It has this in it:

    Wheat grass, alfalfa, barley grass, spirulina, soy, rice bran, flax seed, amaranth, carrot, tomato, broccoli, spinach, kale, shiitake, blueberry, pineapple, papaya, noni concentrate, acidophilus, bifidobacterium, amylase, bromelain, lipase, grape seen extract, bilberry extract, ginger, gamma linoleic acid, docosahexaeonic, lectithin, fructo ogliosaccaride, tricalcium phosphate, xanthan gum, and stevia.

    I'm always worried about things I can't pronounce. But it seems to have lots of good stuff, so what's the verdict?
     
  2. HermitPaws

    HermitPaws "Fourth Molt, A Success"

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    All sounded good til u got to the "gamma linoleic acid"
    i dont think any acid is good Better ask one of the monetors....
     
  3. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    The term acidophilus is used to describe a number of bacteria which help in human digestion. These bacteria include L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, among others. Lactobacilus acidophilus is one of the bacteria found in these mixtures, but the term acidophilus usually refers to a combination of L. acidophilus with other beneficial bacteria.
    What is Acidophilus?

    Bifidobacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, non-motile, often branched anaerobic bacteria. Bifidobacteria are one of the major genera of bacteria that make up the gut flora, the bacteria that reside in the colon. Bifidobacteria aid in digestion, are associated with a lower incidence of allergies (Björkstén et al., 2001) and also prevent some forms of tumor growth (Guarner and Malagelada, 2003). Some bifidobacteria are being used as probiotics.
    Before the 1960s, Bifidobacterium species were collectively referred to as "Lactobacillus bifidus".
    Bifidobacterium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Amylase is an enzyme that breaks starch down into sugar. Amylase is present in human saliva, where it begins the chemical process of digestion. Foods that contain much starch but little sugar, such as rice and potato, taste slightly sweet as they are chewed because amylase turns some of their starch into sugar in the mouth. The pancreas also makes amylase (alpha amylase) to break down dietary starch into di- and trisaccharides which are converted by other enzymes to glucose to supply the body with energy. Plants and some bacteria also produce amylase. As diastase, amylase was the first enzyme to be discovered and isolated (by Anselme Payen in 1833).[citation needed] Specific amylase proteins are designated by different Greek letters. All amylases are glycoside hydrolases and act on α-1,4-glycosidic bonds.
    Amylase - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Bromelain is a mixture of enzymes found naturally in the juice and stems of pineapples. Called a proteolytic enzyme, bromelain is believed to help with the digestion of protein.
    Some bromelain appears to be absorbed by the body intact, so it's also thought to have effects outside the digestive tract. In fact, bromelain is often marketed as a natural anti-inflammatory for conditions such as arthritis. It's one of the most popular supplements in Germany, where it is approved by the Commission E for the treatment of inflammation and swelling of the nose and sinuses due to surgery or injury.
    Bromelain - What You Need to Know About Bromelain
     
  4. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    lipase is a water-soluble enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ester bonds in water–insoluble, lipid substrates[1]. Lipases thus comprise a subclass of the esterases.
    Lipases perform essential roles in the digestion, transport and processing of dietary lipids (e.g. triglycerides, fats, oils) in most- if not all- living organisms. Genes encoding lipases are even present in certain viruses. [2][3
    Lipase - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    γ-Linolenic acid (gamma-linolenic acid or GLA, sometimes called gamolenic acid) is an essential fatty acid found primarily in vegetable oils. It is sold as a dietary supplement for treating problems with inflammation and auto-immune diseases. The efficacy of such use is disputed.
    gamma-Linolenic acid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid. It is found in cold water fatty fish and in fish oil supplements, along with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). There are also vegetarian sources of DHA, which come from seaweed. DHA is essential for the proper functioning of our brains as adults, and for the development of our nervous system and visual abilities during the first 6 months of life. In addition, omega-3 fatty acids are part of a healthy diet that helps lower risk of heart disease. Our bodies naturally produce small amounts of DHA, but we must get the amounts we need from our diet or from supplements. Most people in the Western world do not get enough omega-3 fatty acids in their diet
    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)

    Lecithin is any of a group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, and in egg yolk, composed of phosphoric acid, choline, fatty acids, glycerol, glycolipids, triglycerides, and phospholipids (e.g., phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol). However, lecithin is sometimes used as a synonym for pure phosphatidylcholine, a phospholipid that is the major component of its phosphatide fraction. It may be isolated either from egg yolk (in Greek lekithos—λέκιθος) or from soy beans, from which it is extracted chemically (using hexane) or mechanically.
    It has low solubility in water. In aqueous solution its phospholipids can form either liposomes, bilayer sheets, micelles, or lamellar structures, depending on hydration and temperature. This results in a type of surfactant that is usually classified as amphoteric.
    Lecithin is sold as a food supplement and for medical uses.
    Lecithin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) also sometimes called oligofructose or oligofructan, is a class of oligosaccharides used as an artificial or alternative sweetener. FOS use emerged in the 1980s in response to consumer demand for healthier and calorie-reduced foods. The term oligosaccharide refers to a short chain of sugar molecules (in the case of FOS, fructose molecules). Oligo means few, and saccharide means sugar.
    Fructooligosaccharide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     
  5. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    Tricalcium phosphate is a compound with formula Ca3(PO4)2. It is also known as calcium orthophosphate, tertiary calcium phosphate, tribasic calcium phosphate, or "bone ash" (calcium phosphate being one of the main combustion products of bone).
    It has an alpha and a beta crystal form, the alpha state being formed at high temperatures. As rock, it is found in Whitlockite.
    Tricalcium phosphate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Despite its rather alien-sounding name, xanthanxanthanxanthan gumgumgum is as natural as any other fermented corn sugar polysaccharide you can name. Corn syrup, anyone?
    Seriously, xanthanxanthanxanthan gumgumgum derives its name from the strain of bacteria used during the fermentation process, Xanthomonas campestris. Xanthomonas campestris is the same bacteria responsible for causing black rot to form on broccoli, cauliflower and other leafy vegetables. The bacteria form a slimy substance which acts as a natural stabilizer or thickener. The United States Department of Agriculture ran a number of experiments involving bacteria and various sugars to develop a new thickening agent similar to corn starch or guar gum. When Xanthomonas campestris was combined with corn sugar, the result was a colorless slime called xanthanxanthanxanthan gumgumgum.
    What is Xanthan Gum?

    Stevia is a genus of about 240 species of herbs and shrubs in the sunflower family (Asteraceae), native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central America. The species Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, commonly known as sweetleaf, sweet leaf, sugarleaf, or simply stevia, is widely grown for its sweet leaves. As a sugar substitute, stevia's taste has a slower onset and longer duration than that of sugar, although some of its extracts may have a bitter or licorice-like aftertaste at high concentrations.
    Stevia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    After reading all the ingredients this contains a lot of sugars/sweeteners. Some are natural, but there does seem to be many in your item of question. I would suggest if you use this, to do so as an occasional treat. The other ingredients before the big word ones are very good. Wonder why they have to add all the sugars.
     
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