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Dehydrating Food. . .

Discussion in 'Foods, Treats & Home Recipes.' started by ItsMeg, Feb 7, 2008.

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  1. ItsMeg

    ItsMeg "First Molt, A Success"

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    This may be a silly question -

    But is it possible to dehydrate food

    without

    a food dehydrater? :confused:

    Meg
     
  2. Yadokari

    Yadokari (Small Crab)

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    Sun drying it works if you live in hot places. Although it's still winter, so it's not that great right now.
     
  3. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    You can do it in an oven at a very low setting. I want to say like 300 and for 30 minutes or more. Id make sure to cut the pieces small and thin.
     
  4. ItsMeg

    ItsMeg "First Molt, A Success"

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    Thanks guys!!

    Meg
     
  5. krackersmom2

    krackersmom2 (Large Crab)

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    I was thinking that if you use the oven, it took hours on a really low temp. You could look up food dehydrating on the web.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2008
  6. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    When I did bell peppers it was about 30 minutes. They didnt get rock hard though.
     
  7. susan9347

    susan9347 (Micro Crab)

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    I've read online by many sites that your oven temperature should be at the lowed temperature possible. If you have an old oven like I do then you can keep your heat down to *150. You have to keep your oven door partly open and depending on the fruit/veggie you are drying it can take hours. For sliced banana for example it takes 8-12 hours. Have some in the oven drying now and they have been in there for 3 1/2 hours so far and they probably need another 2 hours. Most people who use the oven will put them in before they go to bed and by morning they should be good. If you have to pay for hydro, your hydro bill will be expensive though. I am in an apartment and landlords pay for hydro so I am not too worried. LOL
     
  8. krackersmom2

    krackersmom2 (Large Crab)

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    Thank you...I'm not totally crazy. I was thinking that to dehydrate in your oven that you put it on the lowest possible setting for hours and hours....Let us know what kinds of foods you are successful with (dehydrating).
     
  9. susan9347

    susan9347 (Micro Crab)

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    Well, today I did the banana slices like I said I put them in the oven. I put them in at 2pm and took them out at 10pm. So that'd be 8 hours. Theyedges were very dry and crisp like it should be, but the center was a bit soft. If I left them in longer it may have worked but gave up. lol They still aren't too bad though. I am going to try something that is a bit more dry. Since bananas are very soft and moist it could of been the problem. Who knows! lol Just have to experiment and see.
     
  10. Jedi_sena

    Jedi_sena (Micro Crab)

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    I use my oven when doing large quantities of shredded bark for Crabotanicals and I would not recommend anything higher than 170 which is the default "warm" setting on my oven. I think 130 is better. You want it to dry before it can mold, but slowly or you'll cook out some nutrients. Vitamin C and other color enhancing nutrients are easily lost to high temperatures. If you can't get lower than 170 degrees, then I would run it with the oven door open, which will keep the house toasty warm in the winter!
     
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