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Antibiotic foods

Discussion in 'Foods, Treats & Home Recipes.' started by NotaMallard, Jan 31, 2009.

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  1. NotaMallard

    NotaMallard "First Molt, A Success"

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    I've read a lot about foods that may help protect hermit crabs against infections and help heal current infections. I'm very interested in this and am wondering what all foods do this. I know about chamomile (I just bought some, yay!) and I am pretty sure calendula and clover do the same thing, but was not positive.

    Also, on a side note: my local co-op didn't have dandelion roots but they did have comfrey root. It was only something like $0.25 for a little bit, so I got some, not positive on whether or not they're safe. So, are they? I need more sources of cellulose, they must be bored with just cork bark.
     
  2. krackersmom2

    krackersmom2 (Large Crab)

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    http://www.hermitcrabsrus.com/forum/foods-treats-home-recipes/2003-safe-food-list.html

    The safe foods list is in the Hermit Crab Diet section of the website. I did not see comfry root on the list. I'm not even sure what that is. I know dandelion flower is okay. Don't forget that you can order safe foods from The Hermit Crab Addiction Store at very reasonable prices. If you can't find something on the safe foods list, then I wouldn't chance it.
     
  3. NotaMallard

    NotaMallard "First Molt, A Success"

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    I already checked both the safe and unsafe lists and didn't see it, but I wanted to see if anyone (particularly Crabotonicals) had tested it. Yeah, I got my last dandelion roots from Vckum's. Now that I read more about comfrey root it turns out it also has antibiotic properties, so I hope it's safe and I can use it. Thanks!
     
  4. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    I found this about comfrey.

    Contemporary herbalists view comfrey as an ambivalent and controversial herb that may offer therapeutic benefits but at the potential risk of liver toxicity.
    One of its country names for comfrey was ‘knitbone’, a reminder of its traditional use in healing. Modern science confirms that comfrey can influence the course of bone ailments.[2] [3] [4] [5]
    The herb contains allantoin, a cell proliferant that speeds up the natural replacement of body cells. Comfrey was used to treat a wide variety of ailments ranging from bronchial problems, broken bones, sprains, arthritis, gastric and varicose ulcers, severe burns, acne and other skin conditions. It was reputed to have bone and teeth building properties in children, and have value in treating ‘many female disorders’. In past times comfrey baths were popular to repair the hymen and thus ‘restore virginity’. Constituents of comfrey also include mucilage, steroidal saponins, tannins, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, inulin, vitamin B12 and proteins.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The flowers of Russian comfrey


    Internal usage of comfrey should be avoided because it contains hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). (Note: there are also non-hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.) Use of comfrey can, because of these PAs, lead to veno-occlusive disease (VOD). VOD can in turn lead to liver failure, and comfrey, taken in extreme amounts, has been implicated in at least one death.[6] In 2001, the United States Food and Drug Administration issued a warning against internal usage of herbal products containing comfrey. [7] There are ways to remove the pyrrolizidine alkaloids from comfrey, and some herbal product manufacturers have begun doing so (although the products will still be labelled “for external use only”).
    Excessive doses of Symphytine, one of the PAs in comfrey, may cause cancer in rats.[8] This was shown by injection of the pure alkaloid. The whole plant has also been shown to induce precancerous changes in transgenic rats.[9]
    Comfrey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I've not heard of anyone using it.
     
  5. NotaMallard

    NotaMallard "First Molt, A Success"

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    Thank you so much Vckums, you're awesome. So it seems to have a lot of benefits but some risks as well... But most of the risks seem as if they'd only affect mammals. Perhaps I'll try a feeding trial. Would you suggest it?
     
  6. Mckenny

    Mckenny "PM Jason For Custom Title"

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    If you're not supposed to injest it, would that be wise? If it were me, I'd want to err on the side of caution and toss it.
     
  7. vckums

    vckums Moderator

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    From what I read it doesn't sound like the treatments were ingested, it's more topical treatments.

    Personally I wouldn't do a trial on it, but that' my choice. If you choose to trial it definately keep us posted on the results.
     
  8. NotaMallard

    NotaMallard "First Molt, A Success"

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    The reasons you aren't supposed to ingest it, from what I gather of what Vicki posted, is because it may cause liver failure and cancer. But hermies don't have livers (do they?) and can't get cancer (can they?). I'm still on the fence of whether or not to do a feeding trial, so more opinions are of course welcome.
     
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